Thursday, November 27, 2014

A Thanksgiving Memory


It was early morning. It was that tingly cold that makes you put on your warmest slippers and flannel robe. As I headed downstairs I cursed my attraction to century-old farmhouses. Although we had tried mightily to seal old glass windows and run heating vents through almost petrified wood beams, the upstairs was always chilly, and even more so in late November with an early cold spell bringing snow and wind to upstate Ohio.

On the way to the kitchen I turned up the thermostat several notches. I turned on the kitchen light and the golden tones of the wooden cabinets and floors glowed. The double window over the kitchen sink reflected a light glittering of snow dusted pink, rose and gold from the first rays of the Eastern sun. The gnarled ancient apple tree branches silhouetted against the pale lavender morning sky cast their charm over me as they always did.

The pilot light on my old, white enamel stove was out again, but I struck a match and the burner glowed warmly in the still chilly kitchen. I checked that the oven pilot light was working and turned that on as well. In deference to the early hour I had left my cast iron skillet, biggest roasting pan and a basket of onions out on the counter the night before.

The refrigerator supplied the butter, celery and a fat turkey ready to be stuffed. Very soon chopped onion and celery were simmering away in butter and their savory scents perfumed the kitchen air. This was the smell of every Thanksgiving past in our family. It was the same scent I anticipated each year when my parent rose at dawn to begin the preparation of our childhood feasts. I can remember laying in my cozy bed and smelling Thanksgiving as it drifted through the house. I hoped my children were having those same feelings on this day.

My huge yellow-ware bowl, used only for preparing food in massive quantities, easily held all my bread crumbs, bread cubes and spices - pungent sage and black pepper, the coarse glisten of kosher salt, the soft, enticing smell of the marjoram. All of the scents combined in that big yellow bowl…ahhh, the fragrance of memories. Soon the onions and celery were tender and the chicken broth warmed and the dressing became moist and aromatic with their addition.

The kitchen had become warm and wonderful and soon the stuffed turkey was in for its long roasting time. The extra stuffing was in its buttered casserole with a scoop saved out inside my little pink stoneware bowl. Now it was time to make some coffee and then start the dinner roll dough rising, time to make the pie crust so it could chill for several hours, time to start chopping vegetables…

But first… a fresh cup of coffee and cream and a small pink bowl filled with stuffing needed to be eaten in front of the big windows overlooking the stark sculpture of winter apple trees and the rosy morning glow of the sky. The house was quiet, the wooly throw was warm on my lap, my children were safely asleep upstairs.

Later the house would fill with relatives and laughter and teasing and conversation. Pies, mashed potatoes, the magnificent turkey, flavorful stuffing, yeasty warm dinner rolls, and homemade jellies glistening like jewels would fill the table.

But for now, my coffee was perfect, the stuffing was savory, memories of all the Thanksgivings that had come before warmed my mind. This moment and this magic was my Thanksgiving.

.....

I still have the giant yellowware bowl. It sits on my counter filled with fruit and random bits of lifes overflow!

Have a blessed day of Thanks, my friends, whether it is a holiday where you live or not.

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9 comments:

Theresa said...

Warm and wonderful... those memories are etched in our heads and hearts:) Have a blessed Thanksgiving dear Jenny! Sending HUGS and PRAYERS your way!

Linda @ A La Carte said...

Wishing you a wonderful day sweet Jenny! Hugs!!

Linda

Sandy McClay said...

Ah Jenny.....I could hear, smell and see all of this! Thank you my friend....Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

Gail said...

A beautiful memory. Here's to many more. Happy Thanksgiving.

Betty said...

Memories. We eat later in the day because I want to be able to feed the cats before we eat so they don't bug us. Downstairs my Butterball (my mother insisted Butterball had the best turkeys) is roasting in my mother's old roasting pan. She used that pan every year while I was growing up and I continue the tradition. I hope you're feeling OK and having a good Thanksgiving Day!

fredamans said...

Happy Thanksgiving!

Janie Junebug said...

Beautifully written, Jenny.

Love,
Janie

Pat Tillett said...

That was really good Jenny!
Your writing has a way of connecting with emotions. To me, that is what good writing is all about.

Annesphamily said...

Beautifully written words. You and Mr. Jenny can both weave a beautiful story.